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Jun 21 12 8:17 PM

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Here are a few photos to get started with, of the 2012 spring toy show held at the Macomb College Sports Center in Warren, Michigan. They always have a little bit of everything there. The model contest they hold with the toy show just puts the icing on the cake for me!








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#3 [url]

Jun 21 12 8:50 PM

And a few more .......... the 5th picture is the '68 Dodge Dart built by Mike Dowd, who has this car on the cover of the June 2012 Scale Auto. There is also a nice article inside the magazine telling about how he built the car. Pretty cool seeing something like this in person.










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#7 [url]

Jun 22 12 1:13 PM

It's doable . I have found that color , although a FLAT in Testors Military enamels . Just shoot some testors Wet look clear over it . The Flathead V-8 was a Copper , but only for 1949. The oil bath aircleaners were both Semi Gloss Black and Copper . I've seen both in my rebuilding days ........

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#8 [url]

Jun 22 12 6:42 PM

It's doable . I have found that color , although a FLAT in Testors Military enamels . Just shoot some testors Wet look clear over it . 

-artformsdesign


Yeah, that color looks a great deal like Model Master SAC Bomber Green, or perhaps their British Interior Gray-Green. There might also be something similar in the little bottle line.

I once painted a '70 Camaro in a MM flat green and then clear-coated it. It came out great!

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#10 [url]

Jun 22 12 9:36 PM

There is a lot of work in a lot of the models that are pictured in all of the photos in this thread. Some of the paint jobs were just astonishing, that someone can get a finish like this on a model car. If you think the pics look nice, you should see these models in person!      And a few more.......










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#11 [url]

Jun 22 12 9:48 PM

Those are stunning.  Those models represent highly skilled workmanship.

I see a lot of nostalgic-looking vehicles there.  What is the median age group of those builders, just out of curiosity?

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#12 [url]

Jun 22 12 10:02 PM

    Those are stunning.  Those models represent highly skilled workmanship.
I see a lot of nostalgic-looking vehicles there.  What is the median age group of those builders, just out of curiosity?

-mwcrowel

I'm not really sure Mark, but I saw a variety of different age builders. They range from their 20s all the way up through at least their 50s or 60s. Not sure what the average age is, but it sure would be interesting to find out! I think they also had some junior builders there as well. I don't know any of the builders who were there, but I have a friend who lives in Taylor MI that knows some of the guys. It might be something he knows a little about. Next time I talk to him, I'll try to remember to ask him.

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#13 [url]

Jun 22 12 10:09 PM

That would be interesting.  It's good that the younger generations are taking up the hobby, so that it doesn't die with the "boomer" generation.  And it looks like young people like the old cars, probably because the old cars had personality and style.

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#14 [url]

Jun 23 12 11:21 AM

Absolutely, Mark. I have three grandsons, and only one of them is interested in models so far. Granted, they aren't very old yet, but I'm trying to get them interested. The oldest one who is 8, wants to build models like his "Papa" (that's me) does, so I bought him a Revell 2010 Mustang convertible Snap-Tite model for his 8th birthday. He still doesn't have it put together yet. He's waiting for his dad to help him, but his birthday was in December. It looks like it's gonna be up to Papa to get the ball rolling so he doesn't get discouraged with it, and lose interest. No problem there for me! My son used to build models too, but hasn't done it since he got interested in girls at around 16 years old (he's 35 now). I thought maybe he would get around and help his boy build his model, and possibly get the bug back himself. Hasn't happened so far. I'm still hoping though!

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#15 [url]

Jun 23 12 4:43 PM

Model cars is probably the signature hobby of the males of our generation.  Of course, we grew up during a time when cars were interesting.

It's up to us to pass the torch.

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#16 [url]

Jun 23 12 5:53 PM

Sadly, I think you are right about model car buiding being the signature of the males of our generation. Most kids nowdays only want to play video games, and be on the computer. I like that stuff to an extent also, but cars are still my biggest passion (next to my family). You are absolutely right about cars being interesting when we were growing up. Although there are still some interesting vehicles, they are not at all like they used to be. I always hear the argument of "the ones now will blow the doors off the older ones". Yes it's true that technology has provided an advantage when it comes to horsepower, transmissions, and gearing. Fuel delivery and ignition advancements via electronics also give the modern vehicles the edge on the older ones. But where they differ greatly is the look and style. You used to get something neat and different every year. You would look forward to the next model year to see what was coming out next. Now, you can't tell one from the other with a lot of them. Ahhh yes.......the good old days! As you said, all we can do now is to try and pass the torch.

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#17 [url]

Jun 23 12 6:33 PM

As you said, Les, today's technology is great.  Modern cars are more reliable and perform better than those of our youth.  However, the wind tunnel determines the modern car's styling.  Why not bring back style, art, and creativity, and still have 21st century technology underneath?

The current generations of Mustangs, Camaros, and Challengers do that, and the American auto industry, whether it realizes it or not, has found the key to reviving itself.  Now all that needs to be done is to apply American retro styling to the cars most of us drive, the regular sedans.  Bring back the look that made us fall in love with our cars back then.

And go back to naming engine displacements in cubic inches!  We're Americans!  We think in cubic inches, not liters.

End of rant.

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#18 [url]

Jun 25 12 12:25 PM

Yes, some of today's technology is great. Cars now go 200,000 to 400,000 miles, and are the safest cars there ever has been. I do miss being able to fix them myself, I have a '95 Buick Regal 3.8 V6 that takes 2 hours to get the battery out of. It's mounted behind the bumper! And, if an older car broke down, the odds were good that it would still run enough to get it home. Now, if they go on the fritz, you got to have them towed. The whole system shuts down!

And, this hobby is mainly for the older folks. The youth is involved but not in the numbers that there used to be. We have a small model club in northern Ky. We get a young person interested, but its only temporary. There are too many distractions nowdays to keep the young people involved, and, with the cost of living, they just do not have the money available to have a extensive, involved hobby. 



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#19 [url]

Jun 25 12 2:20 PM

    As you said, Les, today's technology is great.  Modern cars are more reliable and perform better than those of our youth.  However, the wind tunnel determines the modern car's styling.  Why not bring back style, art, and creativity, and still have 21st century technology underneath?
The current generations of Mustangs, Camaros, and Challengers do that, and the American auto industry, whether it realizes it or not, has found the key to reviving itself.  Now all that needs to be done is to apply American retro styling to the cars most of us drive, the regular sedans.  Bring back the look that made us fall in love with our cars back then.
And go back to naming engine displacements in cubic inches!  We're Americans!  We think in cubic inches, not liters.
End of rant.

-mwcrowel

 

I couldn't have said it better, brother!!

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#20 [url]

Jun 25 12 2:39 PM

      Yes, some of today's technology is great. Cars now go 200,000 to 400,000 miles, and are the safest cars there ever has been. I do miss being able to fix them myself, I have a '95 Buick Regal 3.8 V6 that takes 2 hours to get the battery out of. It's mounted behind the bumper! And, if an older car broke down, the odds were good that it would still run enough to get it home. Now, if they go on the fritz, you got to have them towed. The whole system shuts down!
And, this hobby is mainly for the older folks. The youth is involved but not in the numbers that there used to be. We have a small model club in northern Ky. We get a young person interested, but its only temporary. There are too many distractions nowdays to keep the young people involved, and, with the cost of living, they just do not have the money available to have a extensive, involved hobby. 


-rdmink

I really miss being able to work on them too, Ronnie. I used to do most everything myself on my vehicles when they needed to be fixed. I've done many motor swaps and other major work that needed to be done, in the past. Now you can do very little. My health wouldn't allow me to crawl under them like I used to, but I could still fix things under the hood if it was do-able. Nowdays if you try to do more than change the air filter, you are asking for problems. Sometimes even THAT is a pain! You can't hardly get to anything under the hood anymore.

Yes it's sad that the youth of today doesn't get more interested. Like you said, they have way too many distractions nowdays. And as Mark referred to, a lot of the cars now are just not that interesting. What gets recogonized the most? You guessed it......Mustangs, Camaros, and Challengers.The Vettes still get some too. Yes the sad fact that the cost of kits and paint now, probably have some bearing on it also.  As you said, a lot of them just simply can't afford it. Although they sure seem to keep getting their cell phones and video games with no problem? Hmmmmm......?? 

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