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#21 [url]

Jun 25 12 6:26 PM

As you said, Les, today's technology is great.  Modern cars are more reliable and perform better than those of our youth.  However, the wind tunnel determines the modern car's styling.  Why not bring back style, art, and creativity, and still have 21st century technology underneath?
The current generations of Mustangs, Camaros, and Challengers do that, and the American auto industry, whether it realizes it or not, has found the key to reviving itself.  Now all that needs to be done is to apply American retro styling to the cars most of us drive, the regular sedans.  Bring back the look that made us fall in love with our cars back then.
And go back to naming engine displacements in cubic inches!  We're Americans!  We think in cubic inches, not liters.
End of rant.

-mwcrowel


I was reading some old Motor Trends the other day and one letter to the editor was from some old fart talking about "all the brand new [1967] cars look exactly alike," and talking about the Good Old Days!

Imagine! The man was complaining about the cars of the finest era of automotive styling in the history of the universe! I wonder what he'd say about today's fleet of used bars of soap, all painted either silver or some shade of metallic red. And all of them smiling at you like metal morons. Remember when you could tell a car's make, model and year from two blocks away just from the grille?

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#22 [url]

Jun 25 12 9:39 PM

I DO remember when you could tell them apart.  I'm a 50s guy when it comes to cars.  My Dad tells me that when I was four years old, I could name several brands of cars on sight.  Well, no wonder!  When I was four, the year was 1956, and without exaggeration, I can tell you that every brand of car, and I do mean EVERY brand of car, had it's own identifiable styling.  You could not confuse a Ford with a Mercury, or a Chevrolet with a Pontiac, an Olds with a Buick, or a Plymouth with a Dodge.  Nobody confused the cars of the independent automakers with anyone else's products, either.

The big question is, what can we do to interest kids in our hobby?

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#23 [url]

Jun 26 12 11:25 AM

Well, I think what with absentee parenting all the vogue, we are not going to intrest the young guys in much of anything. The pride is gone in America. Now, it just seems that folks are "Making Do" and getting by anyway they can. A big part of that is because both parents work, and as soon as they are old enough, so do the kids! Then, there is pressure from the schools for children to eat, sleep, and have a school function to attend everyday of the week. Not one family do I know of eats together at the evening meal, anymore! Add the fact that new cars are totally uninspiring, they have become mere applicances designed to get one place to another with very little human involvement in the process, and there is little wonder we cannot get young folks intrested in building or collecting models!  

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#24 [url]

Jun 26 12 8:05 PM

    Well, I think what with absentee parenting all the vogue, we are not going to intrest the young guys in much of anything. The pride is gone in America. Now, it just seems that folks are "Making Do" and getting by anyway they can. A big part of that is because both parents work, and as soon as they are old enough, so do the kids! Then, there is pressure from the schools for children to eat, sleep, and have a school function to attend everyday of the week. Not one family do I know of eats together at the evening meal, anymore! Add the fact that new cars are totally uninspiring, they have become mere applicances designed to get one place to another with very little human involvement in the process, and there is little wonder we cannot get young folks intrested in building or collecting models!  

-rdmink

 

Very well said brother! Very well said!

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#25 [url]

Jun 26 12 9:56 PM

In such situations, perhaps the grandparents can step in.  Children cherish the time spent with their grandparents as much as the time spent with their parents.

Those who have introduced youngsters to old cars, have found that the kids like the old cars.

We can only try, gentlemen, we can only try.

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#26 [url]

Jun 27 12 9:13 PM

    In such situations, perhaps the grandparents can step in.  Children cherish the time spent with their grandparents as much as the time spent with their parents.
Those who have introduced youngsters to old cars, have found that the kids like the old cars.
We can only try, gentlemen, we can only try.

-mwcrowel

You are absolutely right, Mark. I think a lot of the younger people who actually do build model cars, got interested watching their dad or even their grandfather building their models. My son, my two grandsons, and I go to car shows together when possible. I'm doing my best to get them interested in cars and model building. The 8 year old seems to want to, so I'll have to get together and help him put his Mustang convertible togetrher if his dad isn't going to get to it for a while. As you well put it......we can only try!

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#28 [url]

Jun 28 12 11:32 AM

I honestly don't know/can't remember how I contracted car love/lust, as nobody in my family was "car people" and neither were any of my friends. I do remember exactly WHEN it happened, though--1966. The first model cars I ever bought were AMT and MPC '66 annuals. I even still have a few of them, and have over the years bought replacements for others long gone. Just a couple years ago I was able to buy a mint unbuilt AMT '66 Mustang hardtop/convertible kit, which I lusted for back in the day but never got around to buying then. Have also bought several restorable AMT '66 Skylarks and Corvettes, and have definite plans for each.

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#29 [url]

Jun 28 12 11:51 PM

I really don't know how I came to love cars like I do either. Although none of my family was car ignorant, they weren't into them that much either. Even though my grandfather and my dad both worked for General Motors for a while, they weren't really car nuts. My first stepfather bought me my first model car in 1967 for my 7th birthday, and I just went bonkers over cars from that point on. My first stepfather was always tinkering on some old clunker he got somewhere, so I was always watching him (who probably wasn't the best teacher to learn from!). He was a cobbler, and rarely fixed things the right way. I'm just the opposite. I want things fixed right. I too have managed to put three '67 Ford Galaxie kits into my collection over the last 28 years, and finally started building them a month or two ago. I have mananged to find a few of the kits from my early days of model building as well. I really enjoy that.
A lot of us learn from someone else like Mark and I did, but sometimes the interest just develops on it's own as in Snake's case. I'm going to try my best to instill the interest in my grandsons. I hope they get the bug too, but I'm not holding my breath!

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#30 [url]

Jun 29 12 4:29 AM

From an early childhood , I have always been interested in automobiles . My cousins built hot rods for others to run Moonshine in . Shoot, It was common seeing a 56 Cadillac in a 50 Studebaker . I could tear down a Stromberg carburator before I could legally drive . My toys as a kid were rubber Tootsey toys . I graduated into .49c matchbox cars , then model kits in 1960.

Things never changed , I may have gotten out of the model building hobby in 1971, but I still admired kits long afterwards . I spent the next several years manufacturing Van accessories .. During that time , I bought a couple of kits as the subject matter just reached out and grabed me .

I got back in when I sold the business due mostly to a recession  and a lack of demand for my product . I had contracted my skills out as a builder of wrecker bodies and yes, I also owned a part of a wrecker business .

Because the subject matter in kits was what it was , I began to build models of old gasoline pumps . This was my origional hobby dating back to my childhood also . Having a bunch of old rusty pumps wasn't a practical soloution at home , Having models of the same was something I could have .

Today, I go to antique steam shows , car cruises and some gas station exhibits . My son also goes along for the ride . The cycle continues .............

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#31 [url]

Jun 29 12 9:16 AM

I think I was born interested in cars. My Dad worked at the G.M. Norwood, Ohio plant, building Chevys. They tell me I could name makes of cars when I was 2 years old. I remember the first car I saw (In Kentucky, a '57 Olds passed my Dad's '54 Ford on route 25 in the dark) and it has been my predominent activity since. I did meet and marry a beautiful, blonde Indiana farm girl last October, but cars are still my main interest. I have not owned that many real cars, and I wish I had kept some that are now gone (2 '68 Chevy's, '70 Dodge van, '74 "Spirit Of America" Nova, '78 Cougar XR-7 351 V8, '79 Dodge Magnum XE, and a '85 Crown Victoria station wagon), but I have made up for it by buying many die cast and plastic model cars. I have been in the auto service business all my life, I worked for several different dealers as a lot man, then body shop estimator, and I owned my own tire shop and most recently, I appraised classic and special intrest cars, but I had to give it up as my Dad got sick then I had a stroke in 2005. My dream was to own an auto salvage yard, and I have come close, but that dream is all but gone. So, everyone can see why I am so interested in all things automotive. I'll just play with model cars!  

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#33 [url]

Jun 29 12 1:02 PM

In response to Modelcarz, sir I have the soloution . I follow it as closely as I can too. I have a rule an it seems to have worked very well, least for me . Don't buy, lease , work on , model , look at , run into , tow , have a use of or be near ANY car not built AFTER Elvis Presley went to da Great gas Station in da sky !!!!!!!!!!

Both my 53 Ford Panel Delivery , ( 350,000 mis) and a 78 Ford F-100 ( 70,000 mis) have already outlasted all of yer technology . Don't have Power steering , windows , air conditioning , or power locks . I've been in the automobile business since 1964.

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#35 [url]

Jun 29 12 6:55 PM

    In response to Modelcarz, sir I have the soloution . I follow it as closely as I can too. I have a rule an it seems to have worked very well, least for me . Don't buy, lease , work on , model , look at , run into , tow , have a use of or be near ANY car not built AFTER Elvis Presley went to da Great gas Station in da sky !!!!!!!!!!
Both my 53 Ford Panel Delivery , ( 350,000 mis) and a 78 Ford F-100 ( 70,000 mis) have already outlasted all of yer technology . Don't have Power steering , windows , air conditioning , or power locks . I've been in the automobile business since 1964.

-artformsdesign

I can't say as I disagree with ya! Yeah the technology has made some things better, but by the same token has made things a lot more difficult. If I had my choice to pick a new (or newer) vehicle, or something from the 50s or 60s.....I'd take the older one EVERY time! At least ya could work on those if there was a problem. And there was some style to them too.The good old cars are getting pretty scarce, at least around here. I don't mind some of the things out now, but for the most part I'm not too crazy about them.
I worked in the auto parts biz from 1985 til 2007 when I had my lung troubles (no I'm not a smoker!). I'm on disability now, but still  work part-time at a bait shop near where I live. I wish I could, but just can't work full-time anymore. Although I didn't work in the parts biz continuously (it was on-and-off), I still put in quite a few of those years in the automotive world. I also still renew my state motor vehicle mechanic license every year, even though I can't use it. I guess it's the one thing I can't give up after puting all the time and knowledge into getting it. It only costs $20 a year to keep renewing it. I don't  renew the ones that you have to re-take every five years, just the main Engine Repair certification that doesn't expire every five years in my state (so far).

I'd take bets that I'm not the only one who would like to see some pics of yer '53!! LOL! Post some up if ya can!

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#36 [url]

Jun 29 12 9:23 PM

              
Friends, this is great.  This forum is developing as I hoped.  It's where we can look at model cars, and talk about cars to our hearts' content.  Thank you, all.

[image]

-mwcrowel

This is the type of thing I enjoy tremendously too Mark. It's so nice to be able to be a part of a good forum that the concentration is on the modeling subjects, and cars. Too many of the other forums are more concerned about trying to out-do or out-smart someone else. Or "think like me-do like me, I know everything" type of mentality. That's not what these things are supposed to be about. Sure we have our own opinions, and we may not be right all the time, but nobody cuts anyone down for their likes or dislikes, or their style. That's the kind of forum I want to be part of. I believe we may very well have it here.

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#37 [url]

Jul 8 12 2:41 PM

I have not owned that many real cars, and I wish I had kept some that are now gone (2 '68 Chevy's, '70 Dodge van, '74 "Spirit Of America" Nova, '78 Cougar XR-7 351 V8, '79 Dodge Magnum XE,  

-rdmink

I have always wanted a '79 Dodge Magnum, but could never afford one.  So I built a homemade cardboard model of one that I saw new in a showroom.  The link shows photos of it:
http://cardboardmodelcarshowcase.lefora.com/2012/05/12/1979-dodge-magnum/#post2

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#38 [url]

Jul 18 12 1:13 PM

Of course, we grew up during a time when cars were interesting.

-mwcrowel

That may be the crux of the problem with the younger generation. Today, cars all look pretty much the same, designed in wind tunnels for fuel savings.

Nobody today builds real art like the 58 and 59 Caddys, the suicide-door Lincolns and the early Rolls, to name just a few.

On the bright side, I have model cars all around my home office and my 3-year-old grandson loves to run in and yell "Cars!" So there's hope he may want to preserve my collection, something my 4 kids weren't interested in.

How about a list of model car shows, especially promos, within range of Chicago?

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#39 [url]

Jul 18 12 10:25 PM

   
That may be the crux of the problem with the younger generation. Today, cars all look pretty much the same, designed in wind tunnels for fuel savings.
Nobody today builds real art like the 58 and 59 Caddys, the suicide-door Lincolns and the early Rolls, to name just a few.
On the bright side, I have model cars all around my home office and my 3-year-old grandson loves to run in and yell "Cars!" So there's hope he may want to preserve my collection, something my 4 kids weren't interested in.
How about a list of model car shows, especially promos, within range of Chicago?

-modelcarnut

 

I've ran into the same problem when it comes to my children and my model collection. They're not interested in any of it either. Although my son built models until he got married, he then gave what he had to me. My two daughters built a few models too, but not that many. I'm hoping that one or more of my grandsons (I have three right now) will get interested. The oldest one (8 years old) is right ow, so I'll have to try and keep him interested.

I only go to two shows that I know. The one in Warren MI (Detroit area), and Sylvania (formerly Toledo) Ohio. They each have one in the spring, and one in the fall. I think there is still one in Kalamazoo MI in November? I went to a show in Hillside IL years ago with the owner of Spotlight Hobbies (then Hobby Heaven) many years ago (1987 I think). I think that show is still around. Those are the only ones I know of that are close by. There may be others, but I'm not familiar with them. Oh yeah, I think there is a Milwaukee and Waukesha WI show too. I don't know when they have them though.

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#40 [url]

Jul 19 12 8:46 AM

The Kalamazoo antique toy show, called Circus Maximus, occurs twice a year: the third(?) Saturday in May, and the Saturday after Thanksgiving.

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